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Guardianship of Children – What Does it Mean?

Created: Thursday, 15 October 2020 11:34

The idea of guardianship, or being a guardian, is often misunderstood. A guardian of a child is someone to whom the right to make decisions about important matters affecting that child has been given under the Care of Children Act 2004 (the Act). A guardian contributes to a child’s intellectual, emotional, physical, social, cultural and other personal development.

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COVID-19 BUSINESS CONTINUITY - LEVEL 1

Created: Thursday, 08 October 2020 15:58

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Why Have a Will

Created: Monday, 05 October 2020 08:56

Your will is one of the most important documents you will sign in your life. It has a profound effect on the legacy you will leave your loved ones.

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Residential Care Subsidy - Working it Out

Created: Tuesday, 08 September 2020 16:12

The underlying purpose of the Social Securities Act 1964 is to ensure that financial support is available to people who require it.  The availability of this support is subject to means testing, and the Act requires that "where appropriate they should use resources available to them before seeking financial support under this Act".  These resources may include assets held in trust.

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Residential Care Subsidy - A Trust May Affect Eligibility

Created: Tuesday, 08 September 2020 15:50

If you need long term care in a rest home or hospital, you may be eligible to apply for a residential care subsidy.

Eligibility for a residential care subsidy is assessed by the Ministry of Social Development (“MSD”). About 15 years ago MSD changed the asset levels for eligibility for the residential care subsidy. These changes markedly increased the value of assets that an applicant could retain and still be eligible for the subsidy. However, MSD then became more vigilant to ensure that when an applicant had resources available to them, those resources are used before seeking financial support from the state.

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Relationships, New Relationships, and Children – Making the right Will for your circumstances

Created: Friday, 04 September 2020 09:14

Spouses or partners often make wills together, with similar or mirror terms.  They often assume that such wills cannot be changed and will be binding on the other spouse or partner, even if there is a change in future circumstances. This is not always the case. The general rule is that wills can be updated or changed at any time, even if they are signed together and mirror the terms of the will of their spouse or partner.

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